Meeting Schedule

University of North Carolina Wilmington
March 13-15, 2019

Wednesday, March 13: Pre-conference workshops
Please sign up for this day's events when you register for the conference. See our Pre-Conference Workshops page for additional information about each workshop.
 
OpenRefine Introduction with Jerry Waller, Elon University 
Location: Randall Library, UNCW
Cost: $15
Limit: 20 attendees
Time: 1:00-4:00 p.m.

How to Tame your Dragon: Learning to Befriend your Backlog through Efficient Processing with Kelly Spring, East Carolina University
Location: Randall Library
Cost: $25
Limit: 25 attendees

Oral History Creation and Management with Craig Breaden
Location: Randall Library
Cost: $25
Limit: 20 attendees

Special Collections Book Preservationwith Larry Houston
Location: Randall Library
Cost: $50 (NCPC Members) / $75 (non-NCPC members)

6:00-8:00 p.m.
Happy Hour at Waterman’s Brewing Company (1610 Pavilion Place, Wilmington, NC 28403)
Light refreshments provided with food and drink available for purchase.
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Thursday, March 14: Annual Meeting Day 1

8:15-9:00 a.m.
Registration and Breakfast
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

9:00-9:25 a.m.
Welcoming Plenary
Location: Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Speakers:
Lucy Holman, University Librarian, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Dawne Lucas, SNCA Vice President and Special Collections Librarian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

9:30-10:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 1A: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Practicing History with Undergraduates: A Collaborative Approach to Information Literacy in the Archives
Primary source research is a challenging concept for many undergraduates, particularly when they are asked to use the materials to make a historical argument. In this presentation, a history professor, the Special Collections Librarian, and the History Librarian at the University of North Carolina Wilmington will describe their collaborative processes for helping undergraduate history students learn how to locate and analyze primary sources and integrate them into a historical narrative.

Speakers:
Rebecca Baugnon, Special Collections Librarian, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Candice Bredbenner, Associate Professor of History, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Stephanie Crowe, Social Sciences and History Librarian, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Collaborative Teaching at UNC Asheville
Archivists at UNC Asheville’s Special Collections worked with faculty to develop a class that utilized the records of the Housing Authority of the City of Asheville, and other materials, enabling students to research the history of specific properties that were part of the city’s urban redevelopment program. This presentation will describe the collaborative process undertaken, and how this enabled students to unearth history, and gain a greater understanding of present day Asheville.

Speakers:
Anna Peitzman, Metadata Archivist, State Archives of North Carolina
Colin Reeve, Archives and Special Collections Assistant, UNC Asheville

SESSION 1B: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

One Year Older and Ten Years Wiser: A Migration Story
During 2017-2018 the staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center embarked on their biggest infrastructure change to date - the migration of their instance of CONTENTdm to a new content management system. This presentation will briefly discuss how and why we chose the new system, and go into more depth regarding what we did to prepare data before the migration and the challenges that arose during the process.

Speakers:
Lisa Gregory, Program Coordinator, North Carolina Digital Heritage Center
Kristen Merryman, Digital Projects Librarian, North Carolina Digital Heritage Center
Stephanie Williams, Digital Projects Programmer, North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

Collaboration through Analysis: A Journey in Digital Content Management Workflow Analysis
The Government and Heritage Library is halfway through an initiative to evaluate digital content workflows and tools, which includes interviews with catalogers, agency liaisons, and digital staff, to help identify breakdowns in processes and improve digital projects. This presentation provides a project overview, lessons learned, and tactics used during analysis. By taking the time to step back and analyze our workflows, who’s involved, and what’s used, we’re better positioned for future projects, collaborations, and problem-solving along the way.

Speaker:
Andrea Green, Digital Collections Manager, State Library of North Carolina

What a Tangled Web We Weave: Two Data Migration Projects at UNC Greensboro
UNC Greensboro is currently undertaking two major data migration projects - one involving the archival management software for our finding aids and the other replacing our digital collections platform. This presentation will discuss our strategies for migrating content from Archon to ArchivesSpace and from CONTENTdm to Islandora. The presentation will focus on planning and migration strategies; data normalization and standardization; a new metadata schema (MODS) for digital collections; and using interdepartmental, temporary, and student staff.

Speakers:
Patrick Dollar, Processing Archivist, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
David Gwynn, Digital Projects Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Wilson Mericle, Digitization and Metadata Technician, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Finley Turner, Archives Technician, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

10:45-11:00 a.m.
Morning Break
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

11:00-12:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 2A: Lightning Talks
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Great Expectations: How to Provide Service, Manage Change, and Reduce Stress in Archives and Information Organizations
Whether it be the surprised patron upon realizing a whole collection isn't already available online or the staff member/colleague/administrator who dislikes the new system because it isn’t exactly like the one they are used to, everyone working in archives periodically has to address expectations.  During this panel of lightning talks participants will share their experiences with and techniques for managing colleagues' and patrons' expectations of systems, departmental services, and projects.

Lightning Talks:
“But I’m Used to It Working this Way”: Change Management in System Migrations
Alston Cobourn, University Archivist, East Carolina University

Establishing Expectations Early for Successes Later in Digitization Projects
Ashley Knox, Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of North Carolina Wilmington

It Started with a “Simple” Reference Question: Collaborating with Faculty to Unveil UNCW Center for Marine Science History
Adina Riggins, University Archivist, University of North Carolina Wilmington

“Can You Send Me a List?” Providing Excellent Customer Service to Remote Researchers
Rebecca Petersen May, Public Services Archivist, Wake Forest University

Managing Donor Expectations
Greta Reisel Browning, Reference Archivist, Appalachian State University

How to Keep Your Reference Questions from Going Awry in Special Collections
Jennifer Daugherty, North Carolina Collection Librarian, East Carolina University

SESSION 2B: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Campus History As a Tool for Interdisciplinary Teaching Collaborations
NC State University’s Special Collections Research Center uses campus history as a framework to engage with outreach and teaching across a range of disciplines, particularly at a STEM-focused, land-grant institution. Examples of collaborations in two recent Public History and Architecture classes will highlight the potential created by introducing archival and primary source literacies through a lens of empathy, shared space, and student experience, producing new insights and relationships with our communities and surroundings today.

Speakers:
Virginia Ferris, Outreach and Engagement Program Librarian, NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center
Todd Kosmerick, University Archivist, NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center

Do You Know What You’re Missing?: Identifying Records Gaps in a University Archives Collection
You know your archival collections, but do you know what your collection is missing? This presentation will explore Duke University’s new project to review its current University Archives’ holdings in relation to the growing institution and identify the gaps in the archival record where collection development should be focused in the future. The presentation will discuss the review process, challenges faced, and outline future steps for development.

Speaker:
Hillary Gatlin, Records Manager, Duke University

12:15-1:45 p.m.
Lunch and annual business meeting
Location: Warwick Center

1:45-3:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 3A: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

The Asylum, Actualized: Utilizing Public Records and Digital Humanities Tools to Illuminate the History of Mental Health Treatment in America
The Dix Hospital Admissions Database, developed by UNC-Chapel Hill’s Community Histories Workshop, is populated with public records from the state’s oldest asylum. Using the inter-institutional development of the database as a model, this session focuses on inventive, community-based approaches to digitization, transcription, and accessibility, utilizing archival techniques and digital humanities tools to create new methods to explore and actualize the development of 19th Century mental health treatment, providing a collaborative template for similar projects.

Speakers:
Sarah Almond, Project Manager, Community Histories Workshop
Robert Allen, Director, Community Histories Workshop
Will Bosley, General Manager, UNC Digital Innovation Lab

Exploring Interdisciplinarity Using Animal-Centered Collections
Drawing on NCSU Libraries’ collections in the areas of animal rights and welfare, landscape architecture, veterinary medicine, and zoological health, presenters will discuss the ways in which interdisciplinary collections present both opportunities and challenges for advocacy, teaching, and engagement.

Speakers:
Eli Brown, Acting Associate Director for Collections and Research Services, NCSU Libraries; Gwynn Thayer, Acting Department Head, Special Collections, NCSU Libraries; Alyssa Spoonts Robinson, Digital Project Librarian, NCSU Libraries

SESSION 3B: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Blacks in Agriculture in North Carolina: A Collaborative Course and Interdisciplinary Research Project Between NC A&T and NCCU
Participants in the Blacks in Agriculture in North Carolina: A Collaborative Course and Interdisciplinary Research Project between NC A&T and NCCU will speak about what they learned from the course and project as well as their impressions and their experiences. Attention also will be given to the challenges they faced related to interdisciplinary collaboration in an archival setting, and how those challenges were overcome.

Speaker list forthcoming.

3:00-3:15 p.m.
Afternoon Break
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

3:15-4:15 p.m.
Randall Library tours
Location: Meet in Clocktower Lounge

Poster Session
Location: Gateway Lounge, Fisher Student Center

1. The Value of Allies: How Collaboration Revealed the History of Nursing at UNC Charlotte (Olivia Eanes, Reading Room and Archives Assistant, UNC Charlotte; Rita Johnston, Digital Production Librarian, UNC Charlotte; Pamela Mason, Records Analyst, UNC Charlotte)

2. The State Library's Government and Heritage Library (GHL) and the University of North Carolina Wilmington University Archives (UNCW) Collaborate to Digitize State Publications (Denise Jones, State Publications Clearinghouse Liaison, Government and Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina; Ashley Knox, Digital Initiatives Librarian, UNC Wilmington; Adina Riggins, University Archivist, UNC Wilmington)

3. Responsive Archives: Empowering Students as Active Participants in the Life Cycle of Memory (Jessica Cottle, Justice, Equality, Community Project Archivist, Davidson College)

4. Archives and Exhibits: Things to Consider When Mounting an Exhibit in a Small Archive (Randall Bowman, Elon University)

5. Conceptualizing and Curating the Digital Documentary (Heather Lynn Barnes)

6. How I Overcame Inviting Adhesives into the Reading Room: Collaboration Between Special Collections and a Makerspace (Randi Beem, Instruction Archivist, University of North Carolina at Charlotte)

7. Collaborative Curriculum: Building Bridges between UNC's Special Collections Library and First-Year Writing Program (Cait Kennedy, Carolina Academic Library Associate, UNC- Chapel Hill)

8. Collaborative Educational Programs for Grades 6-12: A Study of Partnerships between Special Collection Librarians and Educators (Beth Morris Weiss)

9. Disaster Planning in the Era of Climate Change (Michelle S. Runyon, UNC-Chapel Hill)

10. The Archivist’s Role in the Relocation and/or Recontextualization of Confederate Monuments (Caitlin Rivas, UNC-Chapel Hill)

11. It Takes a Village: Developing North Carolina History Memory Allies for Sustaining ANCHOR, a North Carolina History Online Resource (Kelly Agan, Digital Projects Librarian, Government and Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina)

4:30-6:00 p.m.
Reception and Awards Ceremony
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

Awards Ceremony will begin at 4:30 p.m., with hors d'oeuvres served.  Drinks will be served beginning at 5:00 p.m.
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Friday, March 15: Annual Meeting Day 2

8:15-9:00 a.m.
Registration and Breakfast
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

9:00-10:15 a.m.
Keynote Address
Location: Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

How Do We Know What We Know?
This talk will address the difficulty writers face in pinning down facts as accurately as possible, and the crucial importance of doing so in our current political climate.

Speaker:
Philip Gerard, Department of Creative Writing, University of North Carolina Wilmington and contributor to Our State magazine

10:15-10:30 a.m.
Morning Break
Location: Clocktower Lounge, Fisher Student Center

10:30-11:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 4A: Panel Session  
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Engaging a diverse community in documenting enslaved people
“People Not Property” is an NHPRC-funded expansion of UNCG's Digital Library on American Slavery (http://library.uncg.edu/slavery/) with an interprofessional and community-oriented focus.  The panel will discuss how we built a coalition for the project that includes technologists, archivists, elected officials, genealogists, and more.

Speakers:
Richard Cox, Digital Technology Consultant, UNCG University Libraries
Marcellaus Joiner, Archivist, Heritage Research Center/High Point Public Library
Arwin Smallwood, Professor and Chair, Department of History and Political Science, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

SESSION 4B: Panel Session
Location: Wrightsville Beach Room or Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Grant-funded Collaborative Initiatives at the Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library
Grant-funded initiatives provide opportunities for archivists to engage in collaborations which are mutually beneficial and leverage talent and skills to broaden the reach of historical resources. Atlanta University Center’s (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library has undertaken grant-funded projects to enhance access to art and archival materials. In both projects, AUC Woodruff staff have had to navigate the delicate balance of satisfying multiple stakeholders across institutions in order to fulfill objectives of grant-funded projects on schedule.

Speakers:
Martina Dodd, Museum Education Curator, AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library
Aletha Moore, Digitization Project Manager, AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library
Gayle Schechter, Digital Exhibitions Coordinator, AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library
Christine Wiseman, Head of Digital Services, AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library

Extending the Reach of Southern Audiovisual Sources
This panel session will explore interprofessional collaboration and interdisciplinary archives  work of “Extending the Reach of Southern Audiovisual Sources,” a three-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to address audiovisual preservation and access needs of the Wilson Special Collection Library at University of North Carolina Libraries and regional partners including the State Archives of North Carolina, North Carolina Central University, and Appalachian State University.

Speakers:
Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/Audiovisual Conservator, UNC-Chapel Hill
Anne Wells, Audiovisual Archivist, UNC-Chapel Hill
Steve Weiss, Curator, Southern Folklife Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

11:45-12:45 p.m.
Closing conversation
Location: Azalea Coast Room, Fisher Student Center

Speaker:
Kelly Wooten, SNCA President and Librarian, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

2:00 p.m.

Optional Tours

Option 1: Oakdale Cemetery
Address:  520 N 15th Street, Wilmington NC 28401
Cost: $10; pay at the door
Space limit: 50 people

Option 2: Bellamy Mansion Museum (includes a disaster recovery talk)
Address:  503 Market Street, Wilmington NC 28401
Cost: $9.63; pay in advance
Space limit: 20 people

Option 3: North Carolina Room, New Hanover Public Library
Address: 201 Chestnut St., Wilmington, NC 28401
Cost: None
Space limit: 15-20 people at a time